Campfires in the Wilderness-Leave No Trace When

RVing

  Every summer millions of families take to the road in their RVs searching for that one spot where they can put down temporary roots and enjoy some time away from work, school, and the rigors of life.  Therein are the differences between summer camping trips and full-time RVing; full- timers usually don’t work or go to school, and they never limit themselves to only one place to enjoy the great outdoors. Whether they spend a summer in the mountains, a month at the beach, or a week at an urban park, full-time RVers spend their days experiencing and exploring new and fascinating places.   And, when it comes to the mountains and forests of backcountry wilderness, every hill and valley opens up to dazzling palettes of color and beauty.

Principles of Leave No Trace

These wondrous locations will be around forever if everyone does their part and follows the seven principles of leave no trace. 1.      Plan Ahead and Prepare 2.      Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces 3.      Dispose of Waste Properly 4.      Leave What You Find 5.      Minimize Campfire Impacts 6.      Respect Wildlife 7.      Be Considerate of Other Visitors According to the novelist Charles Dudley Warner, “To poke a wood fire is more solid enjoyment than almost anything else in the world.”  If you take pleasure in sitting around the flames late into the night, you’ll want to adhere to these simple important principles of Leave No Trace.

The True but Sad Story of Memorial Park

Memorial Park fit our family perfectly with a refreshing stream and thousands of shady trees.  Because of all the thick greenery that separated the campsites like a privacy curtain, we had a feeling of solitude, like we were in the mountains alone.  It was wonderful, our prefect getaway. We took a break from camping there for a couple of years, but one evening got the urge to throw our gear in the trunk and go to Memorial Park.  We arrived after dark and quickly set up our tent in order to be courteous to others who might be sleeping.  When morning came, we couldn’t believe what we saw. Standing next to our tent, we could see every campsite throughout the entire park.  From a height of ten feet and below, all shrubbery, saplings, and tree branches were gone.  Campers had completely denuded all vegetation within reach to supply themselves with firewood and roasting sticks for hotdogs and marshmallows.  Gone was the privacy and beauty that this park once offered.

 Applying Leave No Trace to Campfires

 By applying the principles of Leave No Trace to one element of RVing, campfires, we can all help to prevent wilderness areas from becoming like Memorial Park. Plan Ahead and Prepare   Check the rules about gathering firewood before you go.  Most campgrounds do not permit the gathering of any firewood. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces   Admittedly it’s a small stretch to apply this to campfires, but make sure they are in a safe location.  When gathering wood (if permitted), be sure to remain on established trails. Dispose of Waste Properly   How many times have you found a fire ring full of old bottles and cans?  Don’t put trash in your campfire. Leave What You Find  Don’t uproot shrubs or cut branches off trees to make roasting sticks.  Don’t cut down trees for firewood or to make log benches.  You came to this place because of its beauty, leave it that way. Minimize Campfire Impacts   You’ll want to be very careful about bringing firewood you gather from the woods.  It can often be home to insects such as the emerald ash borer that can kill thousands of trees over time.  A safe way to minimize campfire impacts is to bring along a portable campfire that doesn’t require firewood. Respect Wildlife   Don’t forget that a lot of wildlife, especially birds and other small animals, make their homes in trees and downed logs.  Never start a campfire when it’s windy, even a small spark can have big impact on wildlife habitat. Be Considerate of Other Visitors   The last thing you want to find when you pull into a pristine wilderness campground is someone else’s trash, or a scarred landscape, and worst of all, a smoldering fire.  If others are camping nearby, be mindful of which way the wind is blowing your smoke.  Follow the Golden Rule and leave your campsite the way you would want others to leave it for you.

That One Spot

Even full-time RVers have a favorite spot—that one place on earth you connect with the most—that they will have to share with others.  As more campers practice the LNT principles, the appreciation they show for special places will catch on. Take the time to think about your camping experience and what you are leaving for the next folks to come along.

About the Author

Karen Ho Fatt lives in the Rocky Mountains, and is an avid outdoors woman who practices LNT wherever she camps, including her backyard where she and her family enjoy relaxing by the fire.   Her website www.familyfirepit.com features general fire safety info and fire garden products. Here you will also find the perfect portable camp fire or a fire pit for cooking for your summer RVing pleasure.
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2018

Would you like to

write an article

about your camping

experience or

knowledge? Visit

our Writers Needed 

page for more

information.

Campfires in the Wilderness-Leave No

Trace When RVing

  Every summer millions of families take to the road in their RVs searching for that one spot where they can put down temporary roots and enjoy some time away from work, school, and the rigors of life.  Therein are the differences between summer camping trips and full-time RVing; full- timers usually don’t work or go to school, and they never limit themselves to only one place to enjoy the great outdoors. Whether they spend a summer in the mountains, a month at the beach, or a week at an urban park, full-time RVers spend their days experiencing and exploring new and fascinating places.   And, when it comes to the mountains and forests of backcountry wilderness, every hill and valley opens up to dazzling palettes of color and beauty.

Principles of Leave No Trace

These wondrous locations will be around forever if everyone does their part and follows the seven principles of leave no trace. 1.      Plan Ahead and Prepare 2.      Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces 3.      Dispose of Waste Properly 4.      Leave What You Find 5.      Minimize Campfire Impacts 6.      Respect Wildlife 7.      Be Considerate of Other Visitors According to the novelist Charles Dudley Warner, “To poke a wood fire is more solid enjoyment than almost anything else in the world.”  If you take pleasure in sitting around the flames late into the night, you’ll want to adhere to these simple important principles of Leave No Trace.

The True but Sad Story of Memorial

Park

Memorial Park fit our family perfectly with a refreshing stream and thousands of shady trees.  Because of all the thick greenery that separated the campsites like a privacy curtain, we had a feeling of solitude, like we were in the mountains alone.  It was wonderful, our prefect getaway. We took a break from camping there for a couple of years, but one evening got the urge to throw our gear in the trunk and go to Memorial Park.  We arrived after dark and quickly set up our tent in order to be courteous to others who might be sleeping.  When morning came, we couldn’t believe what we saw. Standing next to our tent, we could see every campsite throughout the entire park.  From a height of ten feet and below, all shrubbery, saplings, and tree branches were gone.  Campers had completely denuded all vegetation within reach to supply themselves with firewood and roasting sticks for hotdogs and marshmallows.  Gone was the privacy and beauty that this park once offered.

 Applying Leave No Trace to Campfires

 By applying the principles of Leave No Trace to one element of RVing, campfires, we can all help to prevent wilderness areas from becoming like Memorial Park. Plan Ahead and Prepare   Check the rules about gathering firewood before you go.  Most campgrounds do not permit the gathering of any firewood. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces   Admittedly it’s a small stretch to apply this to campfires, but make sure they are in a safe location.  When gathering wood (if permitted), be sure to remain on established trails. Dispose of Waste Properly   How many times have you found a fire ring full of old bottles and cans?  Don’t put trash in your campfire. Leave What You Find  Don’t uproot shrubs or cut branches off trees to make roasting sticks.  Don’t cut down trees for firewood or to make log benches.  You came to this place because of its beauty, leave it that way. Minimize Campfire Impacts   You’ll want to be very careful about bringing firewood you gather from the woods.  It can often be home to insects such as the emerald ash borer that can kill thousands of trees over time.  A safe way to minimize campfire impacts is to bring along a portable campfire that doesn’t require firewood. Respect Wildlife   Don’t forget that a lot of wildlife, especially birds and other small animals, make their homes in trees and downed logs.  Never start a campfire when it’s windy, even a small spark can have big impact on wildlife habitat. Be Considerate of Other Visitors   The last thing you want to find when you pull into a pristine wilderness campground is someone else’s trash, or a scarred landscape, and worst of all, a smoldering fire.  If others are camping nearby, be mindful of which way the wind is blowing your smoke.  Follow the Golden Rule and leave your campsite the way you would want others to leave it for you.

That One Spot

Even full-time RVers have a favorite spot—that one place on earth you connect with the most—that they will have to share with others.  As more campers practice the LNT principles, the appreciation they show for special places will catch on. Take the time to think about your camping experience and what you are leaving for the next folks to come along.

About the Author

Karen Ho Fatt lives in the Rocky Mountains, and is an avid outdoors woman who practices LNT wherever she camps, including her backyard where she and her family enjoy relaxing by the fire.   Her website www.familyfirepit.com features general fire safety info and fire garden products. Here you will also find the perfect portable camp fire  or a fire pit for cooking for your summer RVing pleasure.
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2018

Would you like to

write an article about

your camping

experience or

knowledge? Visit our

Writers Needed 

page for more

information.

RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com
RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com