The Root Canal Procedure – What Your Dentist Isn't Telling You

According to the American Association of Endodontists (AAE), by 1999, 16 million root canals were being performed in the United States every year. That is a lot of root canals and very few patients understand the ramifications of having this procedure performed. Before we get into the drawbacks to having a root canal, you should realize that there are many benefits to having the procedure that go well beyond delaying the extraction of an infected tooth. Once a tooth has been removed, and the gums heal, you are left with an open gap between adjacent teeth. Unless you opt for a bridge (usually a very poor choice), a dental implant, or partial denture, your teeth will begin to shift into the open gap. This movement can cause misalignment of your bite and damage to the joints connecting your jawbones. After a tooth has been extracted, the underlying bone structure begins to dissolve since there is no chewing pressure to stimulate bone growth. Many people who wear dentures eventually lose so much bone structure that nerves are exposed, thus resulting in pain when chewing, and they can only tolerate eating soft foods.  Although a root canal may seem expensive, the alternatives are far worse, usually more expensive, and can lead to a cascading series of dental failures that result in the needless loss of more teeth, and may end with you wearing dentures. Most often, a dental bridge is recommended, however bridges are notoriously undependable and prone to failure. When a dental bridge is installed, two healthy teeth are ground down to serve as a support for the bridge. It is very common for tooth decay to set up beneath the crowned teeth, or for those teeth to break or fracture under the higher stress levels placed on them because of the bridge. A dental bridge presents you with a high risk, high probability chance that you will lose one or both of the teeth the bridge is mounted on. Dental implants are very expensive and beyond the financial means of the average person, not to mention that the long-term effect of the implant may not be satisfactory. Partial dentures do at least keep adjacent teeth from closing the gap and causing a cascade of other problems, however they are messy and without proper cleaning can contribute to gum disease and tooth decay. With a partial denture, additional dental procedures are required to prepare the surrounding teeth for the dental appliance, and with any dental procedure comes additional risk of damage to healthy teeth. Dental procedures are a major contributing factor to your future dental problems and the fewer fillings, crowns, implants, and partial dentures you have the more likely you will be able to maintain good oral health with the right self-care regimen. Fillings crack and chip allowing bacteria to further decay your teeth. The sealants used with crowns and bridges is highly prone to cracking and thus permits bacterial invasion; tooth decay sets in and progresses undetected beneath the crown until you have a major dental problem that often can only be resolved by pulling the tooth. One of the major downsides to having a root canal is that once the living tissue inside your tooth has been removed, the tooth structure gradually becomes more brittle and subject to fractures and breaks. Once the affected tooth has fractured or broken, you are subject to new infection or tooth extraction if the damage is too serious.  Another significant problem rarely disclosed to dental patients is that it is very common that not all of the infected tooth is removed during the procedure; decay and infection quickly begin anew, and with the nerve system having been removed from the tooth you will not be aware that a major infection is leaking bacteria into your bloodstream until an abscess is formed. The bacteria from these types of dental infections are known contributors to degenerative diseases such as heart disease, dementia, and cancer. The dirty little secret about root canals is that complete removal of bacterial infection is not guaranteed, thus setting you up for potentially significant health issues. No dentist can give you complete assurance that a root canal will be successful in halting the progress of dental infection in that tooth, and subsequent reinfection is all too common. That you are reading this article indicates the odds are you probably already have a severe dental infection and are looking for answers. Although a root canal is a poor choice to have to make, often the best thing to do is to go ahead and do what you can to save the existing tooth while realizing that you may still lose the tooth to infection later on. Pulling the tooth, getting a dental bridge, a dental implant, or partial denture are all poor choices that offer you additional unwanted dental problems in the near future. The next logical step is to prevent tooth decay and gum disease in the first place. Clean, disinfected teeth do not decay and there is a lot that you can do to keep your teeth healthy. I would highly recommend that you read one of the better books around about how to prevent tooth decay and immediately begin taking the simple dental care steps recommended in the book. The title of the  book is Prevent Tooth Decay and Gum Disease - How To Save Your Teeth And Your Health, and is available at Amazon.com.
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The Root Canal Procedure – What Your Dentist

Isn't Telling You

According to the American Association of Endodontists (AAE), by 1999, 16 million root canals were being performed in the United States every year. That is a lot of root canals and very few patients understand the ramifications of having this procedure performed. Before we get into the drawbacks to having a root canal, you should realize that there are many benefits to having the procedure that go well beyond delaying the extraction of an infected tooth. Once a tooth has been removed, and the gums heal, you are left with an open gap between adjacent teeth. Unless you opt for a bridge (usually a very poor choice), a dental implant, or partial denture, your teeth will begin to shift into the open gap. This movement can cause misalignment of your bite and damage to the joints connecting your jawbones. After a tooth has been extracted, the underlying bone structure begins to dissolve since there is no chewing pressure to stimulate bone growth. Many people who wear dentures eventually lose so much bone structure that nerves are exposed, thus resulting in pain when chewing, and they can only tolerate eating soft foods.  Although a root canal may seem expensive, the alternatives are far worse, usually more expensive, and can lead to a cascading series of dental failures that result in the needless loss of more teeth, and may end with you wearing dentures. Most often, a dental bridge is recommended, however bridges are notoriously undependable and prone to failure. When a dental bridge is installed, two healthy teeth are ground down to serve as a support for the bridge. It is very common for tooth decay to set up beneath the crowned teeth, or for those teeth to break or fracture under the higher stress levels placed on them because of the bridge. A dental bridge presents you with a high risk, high probability chance that you will lose one or both of the teeth the bridge is mounted on. Dental implants are very expensive and beyond the financial means of the average person, not to mention that the long-term effect of the implant may not be satisfactory. Partial dentures do at least keep adjacent teeth from closing the gap and causing a cascade of other problems, however they are messy and without proper cleaning can contribute to gum disease and tooth decay. With a partial denture, additional dental procedures are required to prepare the surrounding teeth for the dental appliance, and with any dental procedure comes additional risk of damage to healthy teeth. Dental procedures are a major contributing factor to your future dental problems and the fewer fillings, crowns, implants, and partial dentures you have the more likely you will be able to maintain good oral health with the right self-care regimen. Fillings crack and chip allowing bacteria to further decay your teeth. The sealants used with crowns and bridges is highly prone to cracking and thus permits bacterial invasion; tooth decay sets in and progresses undetected beneath the crown until you have a major dental problem that often can only be resolved by pulling the tooth. One of the major downsides to having a root canal is that once the living tissue inside your tooth has been removed, the tooth structure gradually becomes more brittle and subject to fractures and breaks. Once the affected tooth has fractured or broken, you are subject to new infection or tooth extraction if the damage is too serious.  Another significant problem rarely disclosed to dental patients is that it is very common that not all of the infected tooth is removed during the procedure; decay and infection quickly begin anew, and with the nerve system having been removed from the tooth you will not be aware that a major infection is leaking bacteria into your bloodstream until an abscess is formed. The bacteria from these types of dental infections are known contributors to degenerative diseases such as heart disease, dementia, and cancer. The dirty little secret about root canals is that complete removal of bacterial infection is not guaranteed, thus setting you up for potentially significant health issues. No dentist can give you complete assurance that a root canal will be successful in halting the progress of dental infection in that tooth, and subsequent reinfection is all too common. That you are reading this article indicates the odds are you probably already have a severe dental infection and are looking for answers. Although a root canal is a poor choice to have to make, often the best thing to do is to go ahead and do what you can to save the existing tooth while realizing that you may still lose the tooth to infection later on. Pulling the tooth, getting a dental bridge, a dental implant, or partial denture are all poor choices that offer you additional unwanted dental problems in the near future. The next logical step is to prevent tooth decay and gum disease in the first place. Clean, disinfected teeth do not decay and there is a lot that you can do to keep your teeth healthy. I would highly recommend that you read one of the better books around about how to prevent tooth decay and immediately begin taking the simple dental care steps recommended in the book. The title of the  book is Prevent Tooth Decay and Gum Disease - How To Save Your Teeth And Your Health, and is available at Amazon.com.
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2017

Would you like to

write an article

about your

camping exerience

or knowledge?

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RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com
RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com