RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

Preventing Your RV From Becoming Damp And Moldy

Article Contributed By Sally Writes 10.5 million U.S. households own at least one RV, according to the RV Industry Association. While being able to hit the road whenever the mood takes you and camp out all over the U.S. is one of the biggest benefits of owning a motorhome, there’s a common problem almost every RV owner will tell you about: mold. Mold frequently grows in RVs, as the spores thrive in moist, dark places. However, you needn’t worry about damp and mold in your RV anymore, as these tips will ensure your motorhome stays in top condition. Open the windows Excess water, steam, and condensation are the most common causes of damp and mold growth in an RV, so you need to ensure that you keep all three of these to a minimum. Having the windows open for as long as possible each day is wise, as this will let any trapped steam out. It’s particularly important that you open the windows and even the door when you’re cooking and showering, as these are activities which produce higher than average amounts of steam. Install a dehumidifier Excess moisture in your living space can cause multiple health conditions, including asthma and upper respiratory tract symptoms. Even minor illnesses such as coughs and colds can be caused by damp and mold. Thankfully, you can reduce the likelihood of mold-related illnesses occurring by installing a dehumidifier in your RV. Once your dehumidifier is up and running, it will work to draw in any excess moisture that’s trapped in your RV for you to empty out accordingly. Repair leaks From time to time, small holes will appear in the roof of your RV. These are usually caused by damage, although general wear and tear can cause the roof to break down too. As soon as a hole or crack appears in the infrastructure of your RV, the likelihood of damp and mold appearing increases. It’s, therefore, crucial that you deal with any repairs on your RV as and when they appear, so that you can enjoy your camping adventure worry-free. Dry your clothes outside If you’re anything like the average RV owner, then you will spend between three and four weeks at a time traveling in your RV. During this period, you’re sure to accumulate a whole load of dirty washing, and will undoubtedly wash it at the first campsite you come to with onsite washing facilities. However, you should avoid hanging it up to dry inside your RV, as a 4kg load of washing will fill your motorhome with up to two liters of water, and this is sure to make it damp and moldy. Instead, erect a washing line outside your RV with some string, and hang your clothing up to dry in the great outdoors. RVs can be breeding grounds for damp and mold, but so long as you take action to keep the humidity levels within your RV manageable and prevent excess moisture from creeping in, you’ll have plenty of happy camping journeys in your motorhome.
Preventing Your RV From Becoming Damp And Moldy
Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.

Preventing Your RV From Becoming Damp

And Moldy

Article Contributed By Sally Writes 10.5 million U.S. households own at least one RV, according to the RV Industry Association. While being able to hit the road whenever the mood takes you and camp out all over the U.S. is one of the biggest benefits of owning a motorhome, there’s a common problem almost every RV owner will tell you about: mold. Mold frequently grows in RVs, as the spores thrive in moist, dark places. However, you needn’t worry about damp and mold in your RV anymore, as these tips will ensure your motorhome stays in top condition. Open the windows Excess water, steam, and condensation are the most common causes of damp and mold growth in an RV, so you need to ensure that you keep all three of these to a minimum. Having the windows open for as long as possible each day is wise, as this will let any trapped steam out. It’s particularly important that you open the windows and even the door when you’re cooking and showering, as these are activities which produce higher than average amounts of steam. Install a dehumidifier Excess moisture in your living space can cause multiple health conditions, including asthma and upper respiratory tract symptoms. Even minor illnesses such as coughs and colds can be caused by damp and mold. Thankfully, you can reduce the likelihood of mold-related illnesses occurring by installing a dehumidifier in your RV. Once your dehumidifier is up and running, it will work to draw in any excess moisture that’s trapped in your RV for you to empty out accordingly. Repair leaks From time to time, small holes will appear in the roof of your RV. These are usually caused by damage, although general wear and tear can cause the roof to break down too. As soon as a hole or crack appears in the infrastructure of your RV, the likelihood of damp and mold appearing increases. It’s, therefore, crucial that you deal with any repairs on your RV as and when they appear, so that you can enjoy your camping adventure worry-free. Dry your clothes outside If you’re anything like the average RV owner, then you will spend between three and four weeks at a time traveling in your RV. During this period, you’re sure to accumulate a whole load of dirty washing, and will undoubtedly wash it at the first campsite you come to with onsite washing facilities. However, you should avoid hanging it up to dry inside your RV, as a 4kg load of washing will fill your motorhome with up to two liters of water, and this is sure to make it damp and moldy. Instead, erect a washing line outside your RV with some string, and hang your clothing up to dry in the great outdoors. RVs can be breeding grounds for damp and mold, but so long as you take action to keep the humidity levels within your RV manageable and prevent excess moisture from creeping in, you’ll have plenty of happy camping journeys in your motorhome.
Preventing Your RV From Becoming Damp And Moldy
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.
RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com