RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

Don’t Let Motion Sickness Take The Fun Factor From

Your Next RV Trip

Article Contributed By Sally Writes Motion sickness affects more people than you may realize - up to one in three, according to the NIH. If your partner or friends are avid boondockers who have convinced you to go on your first RV trip, don’t let this condition get in the way of fun. If you notice that when in movement you feel dizzy, nauseous or faint, start with a preventive approach, and if you need further help, don’t be afraid to ask your doctor for the right treatment. Why Does Motion Sickness Occur? Motion sickness on moving vehicles - including RVs, cars and boats - is caused by a mismatch in signals about movement that your brain is receiving. On the one hand, your inner ear, muscles and joints, are telling your brain that you are in movement. On the other hand, your eye tends to focus on a fixed spot, sending signals to the brain that you are still. Think of how you feel when you are riding a fast cable car up a mountain or sitting in a vehicle: to your eye, it can seem like you are not moving at all, but your inner ear and other parts of the body sense that the opposite is true. This dichotomy can lead to symptoms that will only stop when the movement stops. Health professionals believe that there is a genetic component to motion sickness, though its exact causes are difficult to prove. The Preventive Approach Any vehicle that moves, whether it's a boat, a car or an RV, can bring about the symptoms of motion sickness. To avoid dizziness while at sea or on the road, start out by enjoying a good sleep on the nights leading up to your journey. When you are sleep deprived, your reaction time and cognitive abilities are impaired, and you can feel more dizzy and light-headed than when you are well rested. You should also sit facing forward in the RV, and try to sit in the front seat if possible to avoid being subjected to excessive movement. Have a light meal before you leave, avoiding oily and sugary foods, and opting instead for a light, healthy snack. Open windows if you can, so that fresh air flows freely through the RV. Finally, avoid things that can cause nausea, include strong food odours or perfumes. What If The Problem Persists? Different medications exist for motion sickness, including common antihistamines like Benadryl. Because some antihistamines can cause drowsiness, however, they should be avoided if you will be driving. Speak to your doctor about common medications for motion sickness, including transdermal patches (which don’t have major side-effects), Dramamine, and Promethazine. If you are more into natural remedies, try acupressure. The acupressure point called P6 (found on the inner wrist, a few inches below the end of your palm) is commonly stimulated to relieve nausea, vomiting in pregnancy, and motion sickness. Some people find that the use of acupressure bands can also significantly reduce symptoms of motion sickness. There are many remedies for motion sickness, so this condition should be no obstacle to your enjoyment of your first RV trip. Before heading off on a long-haul vacation, try shorter trips using some of the preventive and natural methods mentioned above. If they are unhelpful, the next stage is to visit your doctor for recommended treatment that has maximum efficiency and minimal side-effects.
Don’t Let Motion Sickness Take The Fun Factor From Your Next RV Trip
Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.

Don’t Let Motion Sickness Take The Fun

Factor From Your Next RV

Trip

Article Contributed By Sally Writes Motion sickness affects more people than you may realize - up to one in three, according to the NIH. If your partner or friends are avid boondockers who have convinced you to go on your first RV trip, don’t let this condition get in the way of fun. If you notice that when in movement you feel dizzy, nauseous or faint, start with a preventive approach, and if you need further help, don’t be afraid to ask your doctor for the right treatment. Why Does Motion Sickness Occur? Motion sickness on moving vehicles - including RVs, cars and boats - is caused by a mismatch in signals about movement that your brain is receiving. On the one hand, your inner ear, muscles and joints, are telling your brain that you are in movement. On the other hand, your eye tends to focus on a fixed spot, sending signals to the brain that you are still. Think of how you feel when you are riding a fast cable car up a mountain or sitting in a vehicle: to your eye, it can seem like you are not moving at all, but your inner ear and other parts of the body sense that the opposite is true. This dichotomy can lead to symptoms that will only stop when the movement stops. Health professionals believe that there is a genetic component to motion sickness, though its exact causes are difficult to prove. The Preventive Approach Any vehicle that moves, whether it's a boat, a car or an RV, can bring about the symptoms of motion sickness. To avoid dizziness while at sea or on the road, start out by enjoying a good sleep on the nights leading up to your journey. When you are sleep deprived, your reaction time and cognitive abilities are impaired, and you can feel more dizzy and light-headed than when you are well rested. You should also sit facing forward in the RV, and try to sit in the front seat if possible to avoid being subjected to excessive movement. Have a light meal before you leave, avoiding oily and sugary foods, and opting instead for a light, healthy snack. Open windows if you can, so that fresh air flows freely through the RV. Finally, avoid things that can cause nausea, include strong food odours or perfumes. What If The Problem Persists? Different medications exist for motion sickness, including common antihistamines like Benadryl. Because some antihistamines can cause drowsiness, however, they should be avoided if you will be driving. Speak to your doctor about common medications for motion sickness, including transdermal patches (which don’t have major side-effects), Dramamine, and Promethazine. If you are more into natural remedies, try acupressure. The acupressure point called P6 (found on the inner wrist, a few inches below the end of your palm) is commonly stimulated to relieve nausea, vomiting in pregnancy, and motion sickness. Some people find that the use of acupressure bands can also significantly reduce symptoms of motion sickness. There are many remedies for motion sickness, so this condition should be no obstacle to your enjoyment of your first RV trip. Before heading off on a long-haul vacation, try shorter trips using some of the preventive and natural methods mentioned above. If they are unhelpful, the next stage is to visit your doctor for recommended treatment that has maximum efficiency and minimal side-effects.
Don’t Let Motion Sickness Take The Fun Factor From Your Next RV Trip
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.
RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com