RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

RV Greenhorns Part 1- Buying our first RV

Article Contributed By Marcus Miller It’s a done deal! Cheering and high fives go back and forth between us as we celebrate our achievement. We finally pulled the trigger on our new RV, a thirty-eight-foot fifth wheel toy hauler, subsequent to spending over a year agonizing over makes, models, lengths and styles, with so many choices and decisions to make, now it’s just down to enduring the long ten weeks for the build, with far too much time to second guess our selection. Our odyssey began in late 2015 when I, at my partner's insistence, filled out an application for summer employment in Yellowstone Park. She had worked there herself for several summers and aspired for both of us to spend a season together working for less than minimum wage in the National Park. In choosing from what amounted to be hundreds of positions that I was qualified for I inadvertently checked the box for camp host in one of the RV parks, and wouldn’t you know that instead of being selected as a horse wrangler which I’m more than qualified for having grown up and lived on working ranches for most of my life, we got tabbed to check-in, and help settle campers as Guest Service Agents in Madison Campground. But the criteria, was of course, that we must have an RV. ….and they wanted us on site in three months! Well, that wasn’t going to happen, so we blew off the opportunity, and settled back into our normal active lifestyle. We are both avid primitive campers, having in just the last couple of years, for example, tent camped from Texas out through the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast, then north to Canada, across B.C. and down through Alberta, returning home through Montana, Wyoming and Colorado, followed by quickly repacking for a trip to her native New Zealand and a five- week blitz, up, down and across both the North and South Islands, tent camping most of the way. Those forays and others to Arkansas, West Texas, New Mexico and fishing trips to Colorado have kept us continually planning our next sojourn. I’ve rough camped most of my life, traveling across the U.S. and Canada and through much of Mexico, Central and South America, spent weeks at a time backpacking into the mountains of Montana and Wyoming bow hunting elk, mule deer, and whitetail, but at sixty-two years young, although I enjoy it immensely, my body is beginning to rebel a little, especially on those damp cool mornings that any intrepid tent dweller will experience on occasion.  How many countless mornings I’ve crawled stiff and chilled out of our tent to fix coffee on the camp stove and witnessed someone stepping nimbly out of their elegant Class A motorhome or Class B trailer with a steaming coffee cup already in hand, greeting the new day after a cozy night spent inside walls, has made both of us rethink this experience just a little. So with some trepidation, we decided to dip our toes, to test the water so to speak and look at upgrading to a cushier caravan, and started spending copious hours researching types and styles of RV’s, and unequivocally decided that Class A’s, though extremally posh, had some drawbacks for us. We wanted to be able to explore the areas we parked up in, possibly even grabbing our tent for a day or two, to spend in a remote area inaccessible to the RV, and though we could, and many do, tow a vehicle behind the motorhome, we kept coming back to a Class B, and from there on pursued that style, in its many forms….and so many choices there are.  Because I’ve had an abundance of experience towing long gooseneck trailers, having been in the ranching business for more years than I cared to admit, I was drawn to fifth-wheel units, more for their maneuverability at first, than for any other reason. Initially, we didn’t even consider toy haulers, in fact, I’m not afraid to say, though we both chuckle about it now, neither of us RV greenhorns even knew what a toy hauler was, and when we found out, since we don’t own four- wheelers or motorbikes figured they weren’t for us. We spent months looking at every fifth-wheel we could find, new, used, at shows and private sellers, until one day a lightbulb flashed in my head, and I opened my mind to the possibility of using a toy hauler for something other than the toys it was intended. The longer we looked at RV’s the more we considered doing more than just the occasional camping trip, and we started to contemplate the possibility of living full time for at least a few years in our wheeled abode, and the idea that I could use the garage section of a toy hauler as my office began to make good sense, plus it offered us additional storage space that in any recreational vehicle is a boon.  At this time, I have to concede that my cohort had also discovered YouTube, and the multitude of videos offering both great, and sometimes questionable advice to anyone with the time on their hands to keep flipping from one chronicle to the next. Now while she is retired from a regulated daily grind, I spend my days and many nights crafting dialog for my novels and the occasional magazine article in relative quietude across the casa from her, leaving me to formulate and elucidate my thoughts into something cohesive enough that a publisher or editor will consider worthy of promulgating. For me, that means reclusion, from noise, neighbors and electronic devices, and up until she ascertained these, how-to, let us show you, see how much fun we’re having videos, I reveled in that seclusion. After that, or in the time period I now designate as a.y. (after youtube) I nearly lost my reclusive writing, as I was continually called upon to join her at the big flat screen to watch a comparison of the latest model diesel dually haul truck, or the how-to-fix a flat while dodging traffic on the interstate, or horrors of trailers burned, or blown over, and God help us dragged under the low hanging overpass, thus trimming two feet off the height of the rig, but providing it with a permanent skylight and an insurance adjusters nightmare. “We’re not going to do that, are we?” she’d frightfully ask! “I’m not planning on it,” I’d respond, “as long as you don’t navigate me down a road with low- hanging abutments,” which with grimaces and furrowed brow, she would take that into consideration, though I knew that even if she did lay the course in that direction, it would inevitably be my fault in the end for shearing off the crown of our mobile lodging. At one point I told her, “Maybe you should not watch the RV accident videos, and stick more to tips on how to stow all your belongings from a large four-bedroom house into a thirty-two-foot bumper pull. But she insisted that being forewarned not to pull down the highway in a ninety mile an hour crosswind was valuable information, not to be discounted in our preparation for a life on the beltway. Weeks turned into months of reading and watching reviews of experts in everything RV, and discourses from some whom might be better served staying in a five-star caravansary than maneuvering a forty-foot wheeled cottage down a one-lane country road, we imperceptibly narrowed the search through a cluttered field of manufacturers and floor plans until, with sanguine expectations, we chose what will be our home-on-the-road for the next few years…..or at least till I pull the thirteen-foot tall rig, under a nine-foot six-inch overpass on a backroad in Kansas. Which I can tell you right up front, will be all my fault.   Bio of Marcus Miller Yearning for adventure Marcus ran away from home at an early age, and his travels took him across the U.S. and through Central and South America and the Caribbean. He has worn many hats in his life, working as a private military contractor, kidnap resolution specialist, firearms instructor, self-defense and edged weapons instructor, cowboy, sailor, scuba diving instructor, hunting guide, horse trainer, and adventurer. He spent twenty-two years rescuing kidnap victims from Colombia, Central America, and Mexico. His education was acquired from working and living on the streets, back alleys, fetid jungles and dank ports in third world countries, and he now travels the U.S. in an RV and writes action/adventure novels. He has six novels published and available on Amazon in Kindle and paperback and has written articles published in the July and November 2017 issues of Rock and Gem magazine. He is currently working on book #7. He is 63 years old, single, and enjoys fishing, hiking, camping, cooking, and researching his novels. https://marcusmillerauthor.com/ https://www.facebook.com/redemptionwall/
RV Greenhorns Part 1- Buying our first RV
Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.

RV Greenhorns Part 1- Buying our first RV

Article Contributed By Marcus Miller It’s a done deal! Cheering and high fives go back and forth between us as we celebrate our achievement. We finally pulled the trigger on our new RV, a thirty- eight-foot fifth wheel toy hauler, subsequent to spending over a year agonizing over makes, models, lengths and styles, with so many choices and decisions to make, now it’s just down to enduring the long ten weeks for the build, with far too much time to second guess our selection. Our odyssey began in late 2015 when I, at my partner's insistence, filled out an application for summer employment in Yellowstone Park. She had worked there herself for several summers and aspired for both of us to spend a season together working for less than minimum wage in the National Park. In choosing from what amounted to be hundreds of positions that I was qualified for I inadvertently checked the box for camp host in one of the RV parks, and wouldn’t you know that instead of being selected as a horse wrangler which I’m more than qualified for having grown up and lived on working ranches for most of my life, we got tabbed to check-in, and help settle campers as Guest Service Agents in Madison Campground. But the criteria, was of course, that we must have an RV. ….and they wanted us on site in three months! Well, that wasn’t going to happen, so we blew off the opportunity, and settled back into our normal active lifestyle. We are both avid primitive campers, having in just the last couple of years, for example, tent camped from Texas out through the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast, then north to Canada, across B.C. and down through Alberta, returning home through Montana, Wyoming and Colorado, followed by quickly repacking for a trip to her native New Zealand and a five-week blitz, up, down and across both the North and South Islands, tent camping most of the way. Those forays and others to Arkansas, West Texas, New Mexico and fishing trips to Colorado have kept us continually planning our next sojourn. I’ve rough camped most of my life, traveling across the U.S. and Canada and through much of Mexico, Central and South America, spent weeks at a time backpacking into the mountains of Montana and Wyoming bow hunting elk, mule deer, and whitetail, but at sixty-two years young, although I enjoy it immensely, my body is beginning to rebel a little, especially on those damp cool mornings that any intrepid tent dweller will experience on occasion.  How many countless mornings I’ve crawled stiff and chilled out of our tent to fix coffee on the camp stove and witnessed someone stepping nimbly out of their elegant Class A motorhome or Class B trailer with a steaming coffee cup already in hand, greeting the new day after a cozy night spent inside walls, has made both of us rethink this experience just a little. So with some trepidation, we decided to dip our toes, to test the water so to speak and look at upgrading to a cushier caravan, and started spending copious hours researching types and styles of RV’s, and unequivocally decided that Class A’s, though extremally posh, had some drawbacks for us. We wanted to be able to explore the areas we parked up in, possibly even grabbing our tent for a day or two, to spend in a remote area inaccessible to the RV, and though we could, and many do, tow a vehicle behind the motorhome, we kept coming back to a Class B, and from there on pursued that style, in its many forms….and so many choices there are.  Because I’ve had an abundance of experience towing long gooseneck trailers, having been in the ranching business for more years than I cared to admit, I was drawn to fifth-wheel units, more for their maneuverability at first, than for any other reason. Initially, we didn’t even consider toy haulers, in fact, I’m not afraid to say, though we both chuckle about it now, neither of us RV greenhorns even knew what a toy hauler was, and when we found out, since we don’t own four-wheelers or motorbikes figured they weren’t for us. We spent months looking at every fifth-wheel we could find, new, used, at shows and private sellers, until one day a lightbulb flashed in my head, and I opened my mind to the possibility of using a toy hauler for something other than the toys it was intended. The longer we looked at RV’s the more we considered doing more than just the occasional camping trip, and we started to contemplate the possibility of living full time for at least a few years in our wheeled abode, and the idea that I could use the garage section of a toy hauler as my office began to make good sense, plus it offered us additional storage space that in any recreational vehicle is a boon.  At this time, I have to concede that my cohort had also discovered YouTube, and the multitude of videos offering both great, and sometimes questionable advice to anyone with the time on their hands to keep flipping from one chronicle to the next. Now while she is retired from a regulated daily grind, I spend my days and many nights crafting dialog for my novels and the occasional magazine article in relative quietude across the casa from her, leaving me to formulate and elucidate my thoughts into something cohesive enough that a publisher or editor will consider worthy of promulgating. For me, that means reclusion, from noise, neighbors and electronic devices, and up until she ascertained these, how-to, let us show you, see how much fun we’re having videos, I reveled in that seclusion. After that, or in the time period I now designate as a.y. (after youtube) I nearly lost my reclusive writing, as I was continually called upon to join her at the big flat screen to watch a comparison of the latest model diesel dually haul truck, or the how-to-fix a flat while dodging traffic on the interstate, or horrors of trailers burned, or blown over, and God help us dragged under the low hanging overpass, thus trimming two feet off the height of the rig, but providing it with a permanent skylight and an insurance adjusters nightmare. “We’re not going to do that, are we?” she’d frightfully ask! “I’m not planning on it,” I’d respond, “as long as you don’t navigate me down a road with low-hanging abutments,” which with grimaces and furrowed brow, she would take that into consideration, though I knew that even if she did lay the course in that direction, it would inevitably be my fault in the end for shearing off the crown of our mobile lodging. At one point I told her, “Maybe you should not watch the RV accident videos, and stick more to tips on how to stow all your belongings from a large four-bedroom house into a thirty-two-foot bumper pull. But she insisted that being forewarned not to pull down the highway in a ninety mile an hour crosswind was valuable information, not to be discounted in our preparation for a life on the beltway. Weeks turned into months of reading and watching reviews of experts in everything RV, and discourses from some whom might be better served staying in a five-star caravansary than maneuvering a forty-foot wheeled cottage down a one-lane country road, we imperceptibly narrowed the search through a cluttered field of manufacturers and floor plans until, with sanguine expectations, we chose what will be our home-on-the-road for the next few years…..or at least till I pull the thirteen-foot tall rig, under a nine-foot six-inch overpass on a backroad in Kansas. Which I can tell you right up front, will be all my fault.   Bio of Marcus Miller Yearning for adventure Marcus ran away from home at an early age, and his travels took him across the U.S. and through Central and South America and the Caribbean. He has worn many hats in his life, working as a private military contractor, kidnap resolution specialist, firearms instructor, self-defense and edged weapons instructor, cowboy, sailor, scuba diving instructor, hunting guide, horse trainer, and adventurer. He spent twenty-two years rescuing kidnap victims from Colombia, Central America, and Mexico. His education was acquired from working and living on the streets, back alleys, fetid jungles and dank ports in third world countries, and he now travels the U.S. in an RV and writes action/adventure novels. He has six novels published and available on Amazon in Kindle and paperback and has written articles published in the July and November 2017 issues of Rock and Gem magazine. He is currently working on book #7. He is 63 years old, single, and enjoys fishing, hiking, camping, cooking, and researching his novels. https://marcusmillerauthor.com/ https://www.facebook.com/redemptionwall/
RV Greenhorns Part 1- Buying our first RV
RV Camping - HappyVagabonds.Com Copyright © 2020

Learn about being a work camper and work camping jobs on our Work Camper Jobs page.
RV Camping - Happyvagabonds.com